SHOT Show 2024 has begun, and one of the most eye-catching new model comes from Benchmade. It’s a remastered version of the 710, the first ever Axis Lock. The Seven | Ten, as they’ve styled the name, brings a clutch of tasteful material and mechanical updates to the original classic’s design.

The 710 may be Benchmade’s most historically significant knife. Not only was it an early example of many of the features we associate with modern folders, it also marked the debut of the Williams-McHenry designed Axis Lock, the ambidextrous crossbar mechanism that is synonymous with the company today, and that has spawned no small corral of imitative mechanisms.

We call this a “remaster” because, by and large, Benchmade adhered to the lines of the famous original: you can see the same elongate handle, the same timelessly cool drop point with a mild recurve to the edge. The original came with D2 steel, and that is a fine recipe indeed, but you’ll be happy to hear that the two ‘standard’ Seven | Tens (there’s also a damascus-bladed model) have blades made from coated MagnaCut steel, bringing the performance of this legend right up to snuff with the best of the best in the modern production world.

As we mentioned above, the handle’s shape has been carried forward to the Seven | Ten, but its embellished with more intricate machining patterns, with the damascus variant in particular looking rather dapper with its multiple inlay sections. The Axis Lock itself is new and improved, with bolstered springs and ramped lock studs, similar to those we saw on the Narrows last year. Benchmade also went ahead and gave the Seven | Tens their long, loop over butterfly clip instead of the old-fashioned, standard carry clip that the original came with.

No ETA or price on these yet but stay tuned.

Knives in Featured Image: Benchmade Seven | Ten Series


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