If you felt a tremor just now, don’t panic: that was just the knife world getting rocked by another innovative, boundary-pushing piece of knife tech from KnivesShipFree R&D. KnifeNews has been given the exclusive scoop on the Deepest Carry Clip (or DCC), an ultra-long pocket clip that redefines the nature of how we carry our favorite tool.

KnivesShipFree is one of the leading light knife dealers, and they have a handsome physical location in Ooltewah, Tennessee; most of us know this. But fewer know that an inconspicuous elevator in the KSF warehouse takes you leagues beneath the earth, to the operation’s sprawling, high-tech Research and Development Lab. The facility is headed up by J Rouch, a daring knife engineer who also moonlights as CEO of KSF; he’s clearly a man who wears many hats (including one with a blade on the brim).

Humble even at the peak of his achievements, Rouch tells us that the DCC has been in the works for a long time. “Right after the release of the Lacerator Mk. 5, we opened a new branch in the lab, and brought in a team of world’s leading EDC physicists and engineers to answer one simple question: How deep can ‘deep carry’ really be?”

An early design document showcasing the DCC in action

Working around the clock for a year to the day (“A funny coincidence,” Rouch notes), the team set about answering that question. Starting with your standard deep carry clip, they slowly increased the length to see just how much deeper things could go. “Looking at the average pair of jeans, we realized there was a shocking amount of underutilized space down the leg, beyond the arbitrary boundary of the standard pocket seam,” Rouch says. It took hundreds of prototypes, but at last the Deepest Carry Clip was born.

The DCC measures 8 inches long – dwarfing many knives in terms of overall length. “Why shouldn’t the clip be longer than the knife itself?” Rouch asks. “It’s really the component that sees the most action, keeping your knife secure for hours in between uses.” The DCC ensures that your treasured knife stays buried. “There is no way you’ll lose it now – unless you lose your pants too. With the release of the DCC, our knives are more secure than they’ve ever been.”

It’s not just about pure retention power, though. Says Rouch: “Our studies find that any DCC-equipped knife takes approximately 300% longer to remove from the pocket. In-house testing shows that this process draws attention and admiration from non-enthusiasts around you.” The added length also gives the DCC all sorts of extra utility. “You can use it to reach under the couch for the remote without getting up, scratching your back – you can even hook it over a zipline and ride down from your treehouse, like in the movies,” Rouch tells us.

The DCC is longer than many knives, adding to its impressive nature

Naturally, the magnificent dimensions of the DCC require some aftermarket pocket modification. “We recommend using your favorite knife to cut an ‘extension route’ at the bottom of the inside pants pocket seam,” advises Rouch. But you won’t have to rely on pants-modding for long. “We’ve already heard from several pants manufacturers around the world that they’ll be rolling out ‘extended pocket’ options in their summer 2024 collections, to take into account the impact the DCC is sure to have,” Rouch reveals. “We’re even opening up a new KSF sister site dedicated to selling these garments once they hit the market. Expect PantsShipFree to open by July.”

Clip in Featured Image: KnivesShipFree Deepest Carry Clip


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